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The structural remains of the Linderman Dam are located on the Teton River approximately seven miles upstream from the Teton Dam site, just downstream from the Milk Creek confluence. 

Construction on the Linderman Dam restoration project in the Teton River will begin on Aug. 18, 2021.

Construction may temporarily prevent downstream passage. In some circumstances, recreators may be required to exit the river and re-enter downstream to continue with the float.

The public should use extreme caution around the construction area. There are four signs in place to advise the public of the current hazard. Signs are located at Spring Hollow, two upstream of Linderman Dam, and one at the dam site. Additional cautionary signage will be posted at upstream river access locations.

This phase of the restoration project will build a natural riffle downstream of the existing structure. Ultimately, the restoration project will eliminate safety hazards that are created by the remaining components of the Linderman Dam structure.

Safety hazards are a hydraulic drop and roller at the existing structure, eroded concrete and exposed vertical pipes that protrude into the river flow, and a horizonal concrete beam in the center of the former dam that extends across the river during average base-flow conditions.

Linderman Dam was largely dismantled in 1972 for the construction of Teton Dam. After the 1976 failure of Teton Dam, the river resumed its previous course, and the footings of Linderman Dam were exposed. The structural remains are located on the Teton River approximately seven miles upstream from the Teton Dam site, just downstream from the Milk Creek confluence. Successful project completion will eliminate the safety hazards; improve passage for aquatic species, including native Yellowstone cutthroat trout; rehabilitate the river to a more natural and passable elevation profile; and maintain upstream pool elevation for irrigation demands.